Nasal Polyp


Nasal polyps are growths that develop on the inside of your nose or sinuses. They are not able to spread to other parts of the body. You may have a single nasal polyp or you may have several. Nasal polyps are soft and pearl-colored.

Nasal Polyps
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The exact cause is not known. Several factors may contribute to nasal polyps, including:

Risk Factors

Men, especially those older than age 40 years, are at increased risk. Factors that may increase your chance of developing nasal polyps include:

  • Frequent sinus infections
  • Asthma
  • Aspirin sensitivity or allergy
  • Hay fever or other respiratory allergies
  • Cystic fibrosis
  • Churg-Strauss syndrome—a rare disease that inflames the blood vessels


Very small nasal polyps may not cause any symptoms. Larger polyps may block airflow, making it difficult to breathe through the nose. They can also block the passage of odors, reducing the sense of smell.

Symptoms may include:

  • Mouth breathing
  • A runny nose
  • Constant stuffiness
  • Loss or reduction of sense of smell or taste
  • Dull headaches
  • Snoring
  • Frequent nosebleeds


You will be referred to a specialist. It is important to see a doctor with special training in diagnosing and treating nasal polyps, called an otorhinolaryngologists or an otolaryngologist.

You will be asked questions about your symptoms and medical history. A physical exam will be done, paying particular attention to your nose.

Pictures may be taken of your nose. This can be done with a CT scan .

Your bodily fluids and tissues may be tested. This can be done with:

  • Sweat test
  • Allergy skin tests
  • Biopsy of the polyp


Talk with your doctor about the best treatment plan for you. Treatment options include the following:


Medications may include:

  • Nasal sprays, particularly those containing steroids, to reduce swelling, increase nasal airflow, and help shrink polyps
  • Medications to help reduce swelling and shrink polyps
  • Drugs to control allergies or infection, such as antihistamines for allergies or antibiotics for a bacterial infection


In some cases, surgery may be needed. This can be done with:

  • Polypectomy—Removing nasal polyps. If the polyps are small, this can be done in your doctor's office. Polyps often return, so the procedure may need to be repeated.
  • Endoscopic sinus surgery—Removing the nasal polyps and opening the sinuses where the polyps form.


There are no current guidelines to prevent nasal polyps because the cause is unknown.


Please note, not all procedures included in this resource library are available at Henry Ford Allegiance Health or performed by Henry Ford Allegiance Health physicians.

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