Tetanus (also known as lockjaw) is an infection marked by prolonged muscle spasms. The infection creates a toxin that affects the nervous system. It can be fatal if left untreated.

Nervous System
Copyright © Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.


Tetanus is caused by specific bacteria that is found in soil, dust, or manure. It enters your body through a break in the skin. Once inside the body, the bacteria create a toxin. This toxin causes tetanus.

Risk Factors

Factors that may increase your chance of tetanus include:

  • Lack of tetanus vaccination, regular booster shots, or not updating tetanus vaccination in timely manner
  • IV drug use
  • Skin sores or wounds
  • Burns
  • Exposure of open wounds to soil or animal feces


Tetanus may cause:

  • Headache
  • Stiff jaw muscles or neck muscles
  • Drooling or trouble swallowing
  • Muscle spasticity or rigidity
  • Sweating
  • Fever
  • Irritability
  • Pain or tingling at a wound site
  • Seizures
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Heart beat that is too fast or too slow


The doctor will ask about your symptoms and medical history. A physical exam will be done. The diagnosis is mainly based on the medical history.

Your doctor may test the wound. A culture will grow the bacteria causing the infection. Culture results are not always accurate for tetanus.


Treatment may include:

  • Hospitalization—to manage complications of the infection
  • Opening and cleaning the wound—entire wounded area may need to be surgically removed
  • Antibiotics to fight the bacteria
  • Tetanus immune globulin—antibodies against tetanus that help neutralize the tetanus toxin
  • A tetanus shot—if your tetanus vaccine is not up to date
  • Medication to treat symptoms—may include antiseizure medication or muscle relaxants

Tetanus can cause severe problems with breathing or swallowing. A breathing tube may be inserted in the throat. This will help keep the airway open until you heal. A surgical procedure called a tracheotomy may be done. This will provide an open airway if your upper airway cannot be accessed.


The best means of prevention is immunization. The immunization schedule for tetanus is as follows:

  • All children, with few exceptions should receive the, DTaP vaccine series. This protects against diphtheria , tetanus, and pertussis .
  • A single dose of Tdap vaccine is recommended for children aged 11 years or older, even if they did not receive the DTaP.
  • Adults should receive a booster dose of the tetanus and diphtheria vaccine (Td) every 10 years. They may also receive this vaccine after an exposure to tetanus. It is not harmful to receive a tetanus vaccination earlier than 10 years.

If you or your child has not been fully vaccinated, talk to the doctor. There are catch-up schedules available.

In addition to the vaccine, you can prevent tetanus by taking proper care of wounds:

  • Promptly clean all wounds.
  • See your doctor for medical care of wounds.


Please note, not all procedures included in this resource library are available at Allegiance Health or performed by Allegiance Health physicians.

All EBSCO Publishing proprietary, consumer health and medical information found on this site is accredited by URAC. URAC's Health Web Site Accreditation Program requires compliance with 53 rigorous standards of quality and accountability, verified by independent audits. To send comments or feedback to our Editorial Team regarding the content please email us at HLEditorialTeam@ebscohost.com.

This content is reviewed regularly and is updated when new and relevant evidence is made available. This information is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with questions regarding a medical condition.

Editorial Policy | Privacy Policy | Terms and Conditions | Support
Copyright © 2008 EBSCO Publishing. All rights reserved.

Is joint pain affecting your quality of life? Take this free online health risk assessment to find out. You’ll be able to estimate your personal joint pain and identify risk factors that you may be able to improve.