Reducing Your Risk of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

Alcoholism tends to run in families, and genetic factors partially explain this pattern. It is impossible to reduce your genetic risk. However, risk is not destiny. Certain factors, like strong social support systems , can help protect even high-risk people from becoming alcohol dependent. Other suggestions include:

  • Socialize without alcohol.
  • Avoid going to bars.
  • Do not keep alcohol in your home.
  • Avoid situations and people that encourage drinking.
  • Make new nondrinking friends.
  • Do fun things that do not involve alcohol.
  • Avoid reaching for a drink when stressed or upset.
  • Drink slowly.
  • Replace a drink with something else you really enjoy
  • Limit your alcohol intake to a moderate level.
    • Moderate is two or fewer drinks per day for men and one or fewer drinks per day for women and older adults.
    • A 12-ounce bottle of beer, a five-ounce glass of wine, or 1.5 ounces of liquor is considered one drink.

Revisions

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