Risk Factors for Fibromyalgia

GenderAgeGenetic FactorsSpecific Lifestyle FactorsPsychiatric IllnessRheumatic Diseases

A risk factor is something that increases your likelihood of getting a disease or condition.

It is possible to develop fibromyalgia with or without the risk factors listed below. However, the more risk factors you have, the greater your likelihood of developing fibromyalgia. If you have a number of risk factors, ask your doctor what you can do to reduce your risk.

There are still many questions regarding the exact cause(s) of fibromyalgia, so risk factors are still being identified. Currently, risk factors include:

Although fibromyalgia may develop in men or women, women are more likely to develop fibromyalgia than men.

People between the ages of 20-60 are at the highest risk of developing the onset of fibromyalgia, although it may occur at any age.

There is some indication that genetic factors may be involved in the development of fibromyalgia. Studies have shown that people with family members who have fibromyalgia are at a higher risk of developing it themselves.

People who have recently experienced a traumatic physical or emotional event, such as a divorce or car accident, may be at a higher risk of developing fibromyalgia.

There is evidence that fibromyalgia and obesity may be linked. Fibromyalgia patients are more likely to be obese .

Many people with fibromyalgia report a history of psychiatric symptoms, but many others do not. There is no clear evidence that psychiatric illness causes fibromyalgia.

You may be at higher risk of fibromyalgia if you have rheumatic diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis .

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