Conditions InDepth: Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD)

AUD is a spectrum of alcohol-related issues that include alcohol misuse, abuse, and dependency. It is not solely characterized by the amount of alcohol that is consumed, but rather the effects drinking habits have on social, physical, and mental health.

AUD includes:

  • Binge drinking—The most common pattern of misuse in the US. Personal harm, and unintended injury and death are the most common problems associated with binge drinking. Despite its dangers, binge drinking typically does not lead to abuse or dependence.
  • Alcohol abuse—A pattern of drinking that continues even though it affects relationships, jobs, or family life.
  • Alcohol dependence—Marked by cravings to drink. These cravings may be accompanied by withdrawal symptoms when drinking is stopped.

AUD can have lasting effects on individuals, families, and society. Uncontrolled, AUD can also lead to legal troubles and serious health complications.


The specific cause of AUD is unknown. It often develops because of a complex combination of factors such as:

  • Genetics
  • Family history
  • Altered brain chemistry that affects how alcohol is processed by the body
  • Problem drinking behaviors learned from family and friends
  • Mood and anxiety disorders
  • Peer and social pressures
  • Emotional stress
  • Pain
What are the risk factors for alcoholism? | What are the symptoms of alcoholism? | How is alcoholism diagnosed? | What are the treatments for alcoholism? | Are there screening tests for alcoholism? | How can I reduce my risk of alcoholism? | What questions should I ask my doctor? | What is it like to live with alcoholism? | Where can I get more information about alcoholism?


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