Chronic Renal Failure


Chronic renal failure is an deficiency in kidney function. Kidneys clean waste from the blood, which passes out of the body in urine.

Anatomy of the Kidney
Copyright © Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.


Chronic renal failure is often caused by diseases such as:

Risk Factors

Factors that may increase your chance of chronic renal failure include:


Chronic renal failure may cause:

  • Fatigue
  • Weakness
  • Sleeping problems
  • Weak appetite
  • Nausea
  • Itching
  • Shortness of breath
  • Altered taste
  • Altered mental state


Your doctor will ask about your symptoms and medical history. A physical exam will be done.

Tests may include

Those who are already at high risk for kidney disease should be tested more frequently so any damage can be diagnosed early. People with kidney disease will be referred to a nephrologist (a doctor who specializes in treating kidney disorders).


Chronic renal failure cannot be cured. It is possible to slow the progression of kidney damage.

Treatment may include:

  • Controlling protein in the urine by restricting the amount of protein in the diet or medication
  • Taking ACE inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor antagonists
  • Reducing the use of and the dosages of drugs that may be toxic to the kidneys
  • Managing the complications of chronic renal disease such as fluid overload, high blood phosphate or potassium levels, low blood level of calcium, and anemia
  • Lowering high blood pressure
  • Controlling blood sugar and lipid levels
  • Staying hydrated
  • Controlling salt in the diet
  • Participating in an exercise training program to keep you physically fit and reduce the chance of depression
  • Quitting smoking
  • Undergoing dialysis , a medical process that cleans the blood
  • Having a kidney transplant
  • Counseling for you and your family about dialysis and/or transplant options


To help reduce your chance of chronic renal failure:

  • Get a physical exam every year that includes a urine test to monitor your kidney's health.
  • If you smoke, talk to your doctor about how you can successfully quit..
  • Maintain a healthy weight.
  • Drink water and other fluids to stay hydrated.
  • People who have diabetes, previously known kidney disease, high blood pressure, or are over the age of 60 should be screened regularly for kidney disease.
  • People with a family history of kidney disease should also be screened regularly.


Please note, not all procedures included in this resource library are available at Allegiance Health or performed by Allegiance Health physicians.

All EBSCO Publishing proprietary, consumer health and medical information found on this site is accredited by URAC. URAC's Health Web Site Accreditation Program requires compliance with 53 rigorous standards of quality and accountability, verified by independent audits. To send comments or feedback to our Editorial Team regarding the content please email us at

This content is reviewed regularly and is updated when new and relevant evidence is made available. This information is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with questions regarding a medical condition.

Editorial Policy | Privacy Policy | Terms and Conditions | Support
Copyright © 2008 EBSCO Publishing. All rights reserved.

Anxiety, nervousness, stress and tension can take a toll on your unborn baby’s health. Avoid the triggers and learn to stay calm by using techniques like meditation and yoga.