Chordee

Definition

Chordee is a birth defect of the penis. It causes the penis to be curved downward during an erection.

The Male Reproductive System
Nucleus factsheet image
Copyright © Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.

Causes

Chordee occurs when the baby is developing in the womb. It is sometimes due to a shortened urethra or having thick tissue around the urethra. The urethra is the tube that connects the bladder to the outside of the body so that urine can exit. Other times, the problem may be due to the skin on the bottom side of the penis being too short.

Risk Factors

One risk factor is hypospadias . With this condition, the opening of the urethra is on the bottom of the penis instead of at the tip of the penis.

Symptoms

Symptoms include:

  • Curvature of the penis during erection (does not cause pain)
  • Abnormality of the foreskin

Diagnosis

The condition may be diagnosed during a physical exam. A specialist called a urologist may do a procedure to create an artificial erection. This allows the doctor to examine the penis. Chordee may also be found during surgery to fix another problem that affects the penis.

This condition may not be detected until later in childhood.

Treatment

In mild cases, surgery may not be needed. Your child's condition will be monitored. In other cases, surgery may be done to straighten the penis. The curved appearance will be straightened by:

  • Removing tissue that is constricting the erection
  • Lengthening the urethra
  • Making the longer and shorter sides of the penis equal in length

Surgery is usually done in children aged 3-18 months.

Prevention

There is no known way to prevent this condition.

Revisions

All EBSCO Publishing proprietary, consumer health and medical information found on this site is accredited by URAC. URAC's Health Web Site Accreditation Program requires compliance with 53 rigorous standards of quality and accountability, verified by independent audits. To send comments or feedback to our Editorial Team regarding the content please email us at HLEditorialTeam@ebscohost.com.

This content is reviewed regularly and is updated when new and relevant evidence is made available. This information is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with questions regarding a medical condition.

Editorial Policy | Privacy Policy | Terms and Conditions | Support
Copyright © 2008 EBSCO Publishing. All rights reserved.

If you are a smoker, it’s important for you to understand that smoking slows recovery and increases the risk of problems. Several weeks prior to surgery, talk with your health care provider if you need help quitting.