Conditions InDepth: Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD)/Heartburn

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) results when gastric acid, food, and liquid from the stomach chronically flow up into the esophagus (the tube that connects the mouth to the stomach).

Gastroesophageal Reflux
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GERD is caused by a weakness or transient relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) muscle. The LES sits at the juncture between the esophagus and the stomach. When you eat, food and liquid travel down the esophagus to the stomach. Once they arrive, the resting tone of the LES helps keep stomach contents from refluxing or moving backward into the esophagus. But when the LES is weakened, it does not work properly. Stomach contents may reflux into the esophagus, which can cause the burning sensation in the chest known as heartburn.

While most Americans suffer from heartburn at one time or another, millions of Americans suffer from chronic GERD. Possible long-term complications of GERD include esophagitis, Barrett’s esophagus , esophageal narrowing, and cancer of the esophagus .

What are the risk factors for GERD/heartburn? | What are the symptoms of GERD/heartburn? | How is GERD/heartburn diagnosed? | What are the treatments for GERD/heartburn? | Are there screening tests for GERD/heartburn? | How can I reduce my risk of GERD/heartburn? | What questions should I ask my healthcare provider? | Where can I get more information about GERD/heartburn?

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