Incontinence Center

General Overview

Urinary incontinence is the loss of voluntary bladder control leading to urine leakage. It can be temporary or chronic.

InDepth

Find answers in our in-depth report on urinary incontinence:

Diagnostic and Surgical Procedures

Surgical procedures for urinary incontinence

Living With Urinary Incontinence

In her own words: living with urinary incontinence
elderly woman tennis exercise Treating urinary incontinence

Are you a woman who hesitates to play a favorite sport, like golf or tennis, because the exertion sometimes causes "leaks"? Do you find yourself scanning the personal care aisle of the supermarket, shopping for hygiene products you never thought you'd need? You're not alone.

Preventing Urinary Incontinence

Kegel exercises

Kegel exercises are exercises that strengthen the pelvic floor muscles. They are also called pelvic floor muscle exercises. Kegel exercises are usually recommended for women with urinary or “stress” incontinence. Urinary incontinence often follows childbirth or menopause. Learn more here.

Special Topics

Image for amyBed-wetting

Bed-wetting is involuntary urination during sleep in children over age five. Learn more here.

In his own words: living with benign prostatic hyperplasia

Rubin, 57, is a manager for a multinational manufacturer of electronic systems for jet aircrafts and airports. Here, he describes how he began to exhibit the symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and how he copes with his condition on a daily basis. Read more about Rubin's story and how some BPH symptoms are similar to urinary incontinence.

In his own words: living with prostate cancer

Frank is a 60-year-old security consultant from Florida who travels around the country. He advises companies about ways of strengthening their defenses and managing crises. He learned he had prostate cancer five years ago. Read more about Frank's story and how some prostate cancer symptoms are similar to urinary incontinence.

Related Conditions

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