Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center

General Overview

Inflammatory bowel diseases are long-lasting diseases that cause irritation and ulcers in the gastrointestinal tract. The most common disorders are ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.

InDepth

Find answers in our in-depth report on inflammatory bowel disease:

Diagnostic and Surgical Procedures

Surgical procedures for inflammatory bowel disease

Living With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

In her own words: living with Crohn’s disease

Coping with severe ulcerative colitis: an interview with Richard

Preventing Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Slippery elm

The dried inner bark of the slippery-elm tree was a favorite of many Native American tribes, and was subsequently adopted by European colonists. Slippery elm was used as a treatment for sore throat, coughs, dryness of the lungs, skin inflammations, wounds, and irritation of the digestive tract.

Special Topics

HCA imageIrritable bowel syndrome: strategies for managing a complex condition

Irritable bowel syndrome doesn't easily fit into the traditional medical model. Researchers have not yet come up with a coherent scientific explanation, let alone a cause, for its debilitating symptoms. This means that there is no cure or even a comprehensive treatment. The best that doctors can offer is management of symptoms, one at a time.

When your child has inflammatory bowel disease

Your child is adjusting to medications, diet, and lifestyle changes to manage his disease. But some of the greatest challenges he faces are social and emotional challenges. Find out what you can do to help.

Related Conditions

Natural and Alternative Treatments (By Condition)

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