Skin Cancer Center

General Overview

Skin cancer is a disease in which cancer cells grow in the skin.

Melanoma is a skin cancer of the melanocytes, the cells that make skin color and give moles their dark color.

InDepth

Find answers in our in-depth report on melanoma:

Diagnostic and Surgical Procedures

Living With Melanoma

In his own words: living with melanoma

Preventing Skin Cancer

Keeping skin cancer at bay

Could eating tomatoes help reduce your risk of getting skin cancer? Perhaps, but don't forget the sunscreen and hats, too. Read more here.

Play it safe in the sun

Did you know that even people with dark skin can get skin cancer? Here's how you can protect your skin while you sweat it out in the sun.

Preventing Skin Cancer (Continued)

Rerun imageProtect your skin: how to avoid sun exposure

Although you may feel healthier with a bit of a tan—your skin sure doesn't! The sunlight that warms our bones and makes flowers grow contains UV radiation. Too much UV radiation can damage the skin. Learn more here.

Special Topics

Cancer tests that can save your life

Read more here about screening tests for skin, breast, cervical, and ovarian cancer.

True or False?

True or false: dark-skinned people don’t need sunscreen

Is it true that people with dark skin are not at risk of getting a sunburn or skin cancer?

Related Conditions

Natural and Alternative Treatments (By Condition)

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