Ciprofloxacin Injection 

(sip roe flox' a sin)

IMPORTANT WARNING:

Using ciprofloxacin injection increases the risk that you will develop tendinitis (swelling of a fibrous tissue that connects a bone to a muscle) or have a tendon rupture (tearing of a fibrous tissue that connects a bone to a muscle) during your treatment or for up to several months afterward. These problems may affect tendons in your shoulder, your hand, the back of your ankle, or in other parts of your body. Tendinitis or tendon rupture may happen to people of any age, but the risk is highest in people over 60 years of age. Tell your doctor if you have or have ever had a kidney, heart, or lung transplant; kidney disease; a joint or tendon disorder such as rheumatoid arthritis (a condition in which the body attacks its own joints, causing pain, swelling, and loss of function); or if you participate in regular physical activity. Tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are taking oral or injectable steroids such as dexamethasone (Decadron, Dexpak), methylprednisolone (Medrol), or prednisone (Sterapred). If you experience any of the following symptoms of tendinitis, stop using ciprofloxacin injection, rest, and call your doctor immediately: pain, swelling, tenderness, stiffness, or difficulty in moving a muscle. If you experience any of the following symptoms of tendon rupture, stop using ciprofloxacin injection and get emergency medical treatment: hearing or feeling a snap or pop in a tendon area, bruising after an injury to a tendon area, or inability to move or bear weight on an affected area.

Using ciprofloxacin injection may worsen muscle weakness in people with myasthenia gravis (a disorder of the nervous system that causes muscle weakness) and cause severe difficulty breathing or death. Tell your doctor if you have myasthenia gravis. Your doctor may tell you not to use ciprofloxacin injection. If you have myasthenia gravis and your doctor tells you that you should use ciprofloxacin injection, call your doctor immediately if you experience muscle weakness or difficulty breathing during your treatment.

Talk to your doctor about the risks of using ciprofloxacin injection.

Your doctor or pharmacist will give you the manufacturer's patient information sheet (Medication Guide) when you begin treatment with ciprofloxacin injection. Read the information carefully and ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions. You can also visit the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) website (http://www.fda.gov/Drugs) or the manufacturer's website to obtain the Medication Guide.

WHY is this medicine prescribed?

Ciprofloxacin injection is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria. Ciprofloxacin injection is also used to prevent or treat anthrax (a serious infection that may be spread on purpose as part of a bioterror attack) in people who may have been exposed to anthrax germs in the air. Ciprofloxacin injection is in a class of antibiotics called fluoroquinolones. It works by killing bacteria that cause infections. Antibiotics will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections.

HOW should this medicine be used?

Ciprofloxacin injection comes as a solution (liquid) to be given through a needle or catheter placed in your vein. It is usually infused (injected slowly) intravenously (into a vein) over a period of 60 minutes, usually once every 8 to 12 hours. The length of your treatment depends on the type of infection you have. Your doctor will tell you how long to use ciprofloxacin injection.

You may receive ciprofloxacin injection in a hospital or you may use the medication at home. If you are using ciprofloxacin injection at home, use it at around the same times every day. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or other health care provider to explain any part you do not understand. Use ciprofloxacin injection exactly as directed. Do not infuse it more quickly than directed. Do not use more or less of it or use it more often than prescribed by your doctor.

If you will be using ciprofloxacin injection at home, your healthcare provider will show you how to infuse the medication. Be sure that you understand these directions, and ask your healthcare provider if you have any questions. Ask your healthcare provider what to do if you have any problems infusing ciprofloxacin injection.

You should begin feeling better during the first few days of your treatment with ciprofloxacin injection. If your symptoms do not improve, or if they get worse, call your doctor.

Use ciprofloxacin injection until you finish the prescription, even if you feel better. Do not stop using ciprofloxacin injection without talking to your doctor unless you experience certain serious side effects listed in the IMPORTANT WARNING or SIDE EFFECTS sections. If you stop using ciprofloxacin injection too soon or if you skip doses, your infection may not be completely treated and the bacteria may become resistant to antibiotics.

Are there OTHER USES for this medicine?

In the event of biological warfare, ciprofloxacin may be used to treat and prevent dangerous illnesses that are deliberately spread such as plague, tularemia, and anthrax of the skin or mouth. Talk to your doctor about the risks of using this medication for your condition.

This medication may be prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

What SPECIAL PRECAUTIONS should I follow?

Before using ciprofloxacin injection,

  • tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic or have had a severe reaction to ciprofloxacin or any other quinolone or fluoroquinolone antibiotic such as gatifloxacin (Tequin) (not available in the U.S.), gemifloxacin (Factive), levofloxacin (Levaquin), lomefloxacin (Maxaquin) (not available in the U.S.), moxifloxacin (Avelox), nalidixic acid (NegGram), norfloxacin (Noroxin), ofloxacin (Floxin), and sparfloxacin (Zagam) (not available in the U.S.), or if you are allergic to any other medications.
  • tell your doctor if you are taking tizanidine (Zanaflex). Your doctor will probably tell you not to use ciprofloxacin injection while you are taking this medication.
  • tell your doctor and pharmacist what other prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to mention the medications listed in the IMPORTANT WARNING section and any of the following: anticoagulants ('blood thinners') such as warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven); certain antidepressants; antipsychotics (medications to treat mental illness); caffeine or medications that contain caffeine (Excedrin, NoDoz, Vivarin, others); clozapine (Clozaril, FazaClo); cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral, Sandimmune); diuretics ('water pills'); glyburide (DiaBeta, in Glucovance, Micronase, others); certain medications for irregular heartbeat such as amiodarone (Cordarone), disopyramide (Norpace), procainamide (Procanbid), quinidine, and sotalol (Betapace, Betapace AF, Sorine); methotrexate (Rheumatrex, Trexall); metoclopramide (Reglan); certain nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others) and naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn, others); phenytoin (Dilantin, Phenytek); probenecid (in Col-Probenecid, Probalan); ropinirole (Requip); or theophylline (Elixophyllin, Theo-24, Uniphyl others). Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you carefully for side effects. Many other medications may also interact with ciprofloxacin, so be sure to tell your doctor about all the medications you are taking, even those that do not appear on this list.
  • tell your doctor if you or anyone in your family has or has ever had prolonged QT interval (a rare heart problem that may cause irregular heartbeat, fainting, or sudden death) or an irregular heartbeat, and if you have or have ever had nerve problems; a low level of potassium in your blood; cerebral arteriosclerosis (narrowing of blood vessels in or near the brain that can lead to stroke or ministroke); seizures; or liver disease.
  • tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while using ciprofloxacin injection, call your doctor.
  • you should know that ciprofloxacin injection may cause confusion, dizziness, lightheadedness, and tiredness. Do not drive a car, operate machinery, or participate in activities requiring alertness or coordination until you know how this medication affects you.
  • plan to avoid unnecessary or prolonged exposure to sunlight or ultraviolet light (tanning beds and sunlamps) and to wear protective clothing, sunglasses, and sunscreen. Ciprofloxacin injection may make your skin sensitive to sunlight or ultraviolet light. If your skin becomes reddened, swollen, or blistered, like a bad sunburn, call your doctor.

What SPECIAL DIETARY instructions should I follow?

Do not drink or eat a lot of caffeine-containing products such as coffee, tea, energy drinks, cola, or chocolate. Ciprofloxacin injection may increase nervousness, sleeplessness, heart pounding, and anxiety caused by caffeine.

Make sure you drink plenty of water or other fluids every day while you are using ciprofloxacin injection.

What should I do IF I FORGET to take a dose?

Infuse the missed dose as soon as you remember it. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and continue your regular dosing schedule. Do not infuse a double dose to make up for a missed one.

What SIDE EFFECTS can this medicine cause?

Ciprofloxacin injection may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:

• nausea

  • vomiting
  • stomach pain
  • heartburn
  • diarrhea
  • headache
  • irritation, pain, tenderness, redness, warmth, or swelling at the injection spot
  • vaginal itching and/or discharge

Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of these symptoms, call your doctor immediately, but do not stop using ciprofloxacin injection without talking to your doctor:

  • severe diarrhea (watery or bloody stools) that may occur with or without fever and stomach cramps (may occur up to 2 months or more after your treatment)
  • dizziness
  • confusion
  • nervousness
  • restlessness

• anxiety

  • not trusting others or feeling that others want to hurt you
  • difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep
  • nightmares or abnormal dreams
  • hallucinations (seeing things or hearing voices that do not exist)
  • depression
  • thoughts about dying or killing yourself
  • uncontrollable shaking of a part of the body

If you experience any of the following symptoms, or the symptoms of tendinitis or tendon rupture described in the IMPORTANT WARNING section, stop using ciprofloxacin injection and call your doctor immediately or get emergency medical help:

• rash

• hives

• itching

  • peeling or blistering of the skin

• fever

  • swelling of the eyes, face, mouth, lips, tongue, throat, hands, feet, ankles or lower legs
  • hoarseness
  • difficulty breathing or swallowing
  • fast heartbeat
  • fainting
  • loss of consciousness
  • yellowing of the skin or eyes
  • dark urine
  • decreased urination
  • seizures
  • unusual bruising or bleeding
  • joint or muscle pain

Ciprofloxacin injection may cause problems with bones, joints, and tissues around joints in children. Ciprofloxacin injection should not normally be given to children younger than 18 years of age unless they have certain serious infections that cannot be treated with other antibiotics or they have been exposed to anthrax in the air. If your doctor prescribes ciprofloxacin injection for your child, be sure to tell the doctor if your child has or has ever had joint-related problems. Call your doctor if your child develops joint problems, such as pain or swelling, while using ciprofloxacin injection or after treatment with ciprofloxacin injection.

Ciprofloxacin injection may cause nerve damage that may not go away even after you stop using ciprofloxacin injection. This damage may occur soon after you begin using ciprofloxacin injection. If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately: numbness, tingling, pain, or burning in the arms or legs; or a change in your ability to feel light touch, pain, heat, or cold. If you experience these symptoms, do not use any more ciprofloxacin injection until you talk to your doctor. Your doctor may prescribe a different antibiotic for you to use instead of ciprofloxacin injection.

Talk to your doctor about the risks of using ciprofloxacin injection or giving ciprofloxacin injection to your child.

Ciprofloxacin injection may cause other side effects. Call your doctor if you have any unusual problems while using this medication.

If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online [at http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch ] or by phone [1-800-332-1088].

What should I know about STORAGE and DISPOSAL of this medication?

Your healthcare provider will tell you how to store your medication. . Store your medication only as directed. Make sure you understand how to store your medication properly. Throw away any medication that is outdated or no longer needed. Talk to your healthcare provider about the proper disposal of your medication.

Keep your supplies in a clean, dry place out of the reach of children when you are not using them. Your healthcare provider will tell you how to throw away used needles, syringes, tubing, and containers to avoid accidental injury.

What should I do in case of OVERDOSE?

In case of overdose, call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. If the victim has collapsed or is not breathing, call local emergency services at 911.

What OTHER INFORMATION should I know?

Keep all appointments with your doctor and the laboratory. Your doctor may order certain lab tests to check your body's response to ciprofloxacin injection.

Do not let anyone else use your medication. Your prescription is probably not refillable. If you still have symptoms of infection after you finish using ciprofloxacin, call your doctor.

It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this list with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies.

Brand Names
  • Cipro® I.V.
  • Also available generically

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