Famotidine Injection 

(fa moe' ti deen)

WHY is this medicine prescribed?

Famotidine injection is used in people who are hospitalized to treat certain conditions in which the stomach produces too much acid or to treat ulcers (sores in the lining of the stomach or intestine) that were not successfully treated with other medications. Famotidine injection is also used on a short-term basis in people who cannot take oral medication

  • to treat ulcers,
  • to prevent ulcers from returning after they have healed,
  • to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD, a condition in which backward flow of acid from the stomach causes heartburn and injury of the esophagus [tube between the throat and the stomach]),
  • and to treat conditions where the stomach produces too much acid, such as Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (tumors in the pancreas and small intestine that caused increased production of stomach acid). Famotidine injection is in a class of medications called H2 blockers. It works by decreasing the amount of acid made in the stomach.

HOW should this medicine be used?

Famotidine injection comes as a solution (liquid) to be mixed with another fluid and injected intravenously (into a vein) over 2 to 30 minutes. It also is available as a premixed product to inject intravenously over 15 to 30 minutes. It is usually given every 12 hours.

You may receive famotidine injection in a hospital or you may administer the medication at home. If you will be receiving famotidine injection at home, your healthcare provider will show you how to use the medication. Be sure that you understand these directions, and ask your healthcare provider if you have any questions.

Are there OTHER USES for this medicine?

This medication may be prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

What SPECIAL PRECAUTIONS should I follow?

Before receiving famotidine injection,

  • tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to famotidine, cimetidine, nizatidine (Axid), ranitidine (Zantac), any other medications, or any of the ingredients in famotidine injection. Ask your pharmacist for a list of the ingredients.
  • tell your doctor and pharmacist what other prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking or plan to take. Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you carefully for side effects.
  • tell your doctor if you have or have ever had kidney disease.
  • tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while receiving famotidine injection, call your doctor.

What SPECIAL DIETARY instructions should I follow?

Unless your doctor tells you otherwise, continue your normal diet.

What SIDE EFFECTS can this medicine cause?

Famotidine injection may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:

  • headache
  • dizziness
  • constipation
  • diarrhea
  • pain or swelling in the area where the medication was injected

Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of these symptoms, call your doctor immediately or get emergency medical treatment

• hives

• rash

• itching

  • difficulty breathing or swallowing
  • swelling of the face, throat, tongue, lips, eyes, hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs
  • hoarseness

Famotidine injection may cause other side effects. Call your doctor if you have any unusual problems while taking this medication.

If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online (http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch) or by phone (1-800-332-1088).

What should I do in case of OVERDOSE?

In case of overdose, call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. If the victim has collapsed or is not breathing, call local emergency services at 911.

What OTHER INFORMATION should I know?

Keep all appointments with your doctor.

It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this list with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies.

Brand Names
  • Pepcid[¶]
  • Also available generically

This branded product is no longer on the market. Generic alternatives may be available.

Please note, not all procedures included in this resource library are available at Henry Ford Allegiance Health or performed by Henry Ford Allegiance Health physicians.

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This content is reviewed regularly and is updated when new and relevant evidence is made available. This information is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with questions regarding a medical condition.

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