Standing During Meetings May Get Creative Juices Flowing

Study found teams that met in rooms without chairs shared more ideas

FRIDAY, June 13, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Need to get more out of routine office meetings? Getting colleagues to stand up during those gatherings might help, new research suggests.

The new study included teams who were given 30 minutes to develop and record a university recruitment video. Some groups did this in rooms with chairs around a table while others had no chairs.

People in the standing teams were more excited about the creative process and more willing to offer ideas, which resulted in more information-sharing and better videos, according to the findings published online June 12 in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science.

"Seeing that the physical space in which a group works can alter how people think about their work and how they relate with one another was very exciting," study co-author Andrew Knight, of the Olin Business School at Washington University, said in a journal news release.

"Our study shows that even a small tweak to a physical space can alter how people work with one another," he added.

Removing chairs and adding whiteboards are inexpensive ways for organizations to encourage staff to brainstorm and collaborate, according to Knight.

The researchers now want to study the effects of different room designs in the real world.

"Working in the field, with real organizations, will help us to examine the longer-term effects of physical space manipulations," Knight said.

More information

The U.S. Department of Labor has more about teamwork (http://www.dol.gov/dol/media/webcast/20121015-softskills/20121015-softskills-2-Teamwork.htm ).

-- Robert Preidt

SOURCE: Social Psychological and Personality Science, news release, June 12, 2014

All EBSCO Publishing proprietary, consumer health and medical information found on this site is accredited by URAC. URAC's Health Web Site Accreditation Program requires compliance with 53 rigorous standards of quality and accountability, verified by independent audits. To send comments or feedback to our Editorial Team regarding the content please email us at HLEditorialTeam@ebscohost.com.

This content is reviewed regularly and is updated when new and relevant evidence is made available. This information is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with questions regarding a medical condition.

Editorial Policy | Privacy Policy | Terms and Conditions | Support
Copyright © 2008 EBSCO Publishing. All rights reserved.

One of the most important things you can do to lower your risk of stroke is to keep your blood pressure in check with exercise, stress management and reducing your intake of salt and alcohol.