Current Journal Research

Expressive Writing Might Improve Quality of Life in Women with Breast Cancer

10/31/2017 Women who have breast cancer may undergo a variety of treatments, including surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and other medications, depending on the stage and type of cancer. This study found that non-pharmacologic interventions, including expressive writing, may have an effect on a middle-aged woman with breast cancer.

Fruit Juice May Not Be Linked to Child Weight Gain

09/30/2017 Fruit juice is a common beverage for children, but it contains a lot of calories. This study found that consumption of 100% fruit juice is associated with a small amount of weight gain in children ages 1 to 6 years that is not clinically significant and is not associated with weight gain in children 7 to 18 years.

Anti-Mite Bedding May Reduce Hospitalization in Mite-Sensitive Children with Asthma

08/22/2017 Researchers wanted to evaluate the use of dust mite-impermeable bedding and its impact on severe asthma exacerbations in children. The study found that the bedding may be effective in reducing the number of hospitalizations and/or emergency room visits of mite-sensitized children with asthma.

Swaddling May Increase Risk of SIDS

07/31/2017 Swaddling is a practice used to wrap infants in cloth to mimic the mother's womb and promote calm and sleep. One study found that the risk of SIDS from swaddling was higher in infants in front or side sleep positions.

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Drink extra fluids throughout pregnancy to help your body keep up with the increases in your blood volume. It is important to drink at least six to eight glasses of water, fruit juice or milk each day.