Health Tip: Understanding the HPV Vaccine

(HealthDay News) -- The HPV vaccine protects against human papillomavirus, which has been shown to cause cancer in males and females, the American Cancer Society says.

More than 270 million doses have been administered since 2006, reports the society, saying studies have shown the vaccine is safe.

The society adds:

  • The HPV vaccination is for boys and girls. It helps prevent infection with the most common types of HPV that can cause cervical, throat, vulvar, vaginal, penile and anal cancer.
  • The vaccine is recommended at ages 11 or 12.
  • The shot is given in two doses, six- to 12-months apart.
  • The vaccine does not contain harmful ingredients. It does contain aluminum, which is found in everyday food and cooking utensils, the ACS says.
  • The vaccine does not cause fertility issues.

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